The last Friday of September, science and research is celebrated in over 370 cities in 27 countries across Europe. In Sweden, activities are organised in 28 cities and towns across the country.

In 2018, the European Researchers’ Night takes place on the 28 September, continuing on the following day. Activities will take place in at least 27 cities, organised by e.g. universities, science centres, museums, research centres, municipalities, science parks and regional development councils. The event is coordinated by the Swedish non-profit organisation Vetenskap & Allmänhet (Public & Science), VA.

Activities range from experiments and maker spaces to demonstrations, shows and exhibitions, as well as science cafés and talks in small groups. These innovative and exciting activities allow for public engagement and meetings with researchers in relaxed and festive environments. The events are aimed at showing that researchers are ordinary people with extraordinary jobs and that research is all about communication and international cooperation.

European Researchers’ Night in Sweden is funded by the European Commission under HORIZON 2020 in the framework of the Marie Sklodowska Curie actions, GA 818421, together with our Swedish partners.

Further information:

For more information about ForskarFredag in Sweden contact Lena Söderström, Project Manager of European Researchers’ Night in Sweden, [email protected], tel +46 8 70 716 06 44.


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