Young people in Sweden, Spain, Ireland and the UK help researchers successfully test new method for measuring light pollution

In 2019 and early 2020, school pupils, teachers, scout groups, astronomers and interested members of the public in Sweden, Spain, the UK and Ireland went out to count stars in the night sky. The objective was to help researchers to test a new method for measuring light pollution. Researchers have analysed the results and these have now been published.

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Swedish pupils to participate in research to reduce food waste

Can more information result in less food being wasted? Researchers will be investigating this together with pupils and teachers across the whole of Sweden in the Food Waste Experiment. To assist them, they will be using an artificial intelligence app and the world’s largest food sustainability database. Läs mer


Mass star-spotting experiment to investigate light pollution in Sweden

Street lamps, illuminated signs and buildings – lights at night improve safety and make cities more attractive, but have also been shown to have negative effects for humans and animals. The more light there is, the fewer stars you can see in the night sky. In this year’s mass experiment, more than 11,000 pupils, families and other members of the public will help scientists measure light pollution by counting stars in the sky.

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Swedish citizen science initiative combines ladybird monitoring with artificial intelligence

Biodiversity is under threat. Can an app that recognises different species of ladybirds help provide a solution? Pupils and members of the public from across Sweden are being invited to get involved in real research to find out in a mass experiment being run as part of the 2018 Researchers’ Night in Sweden. The Ladybird Experiment is joint initiative between the Swedish Museum of Natural History and the civil society organisation VA (Public & Science).

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Swedish mass experiment investigates credibility of teenagers’ news feeds

Press Release 24 October 2017

How credible do teenagers think the news in their digital news feeds is? And where do they get their news from? Around 6,000 pupils have been helping researchers to investigate these questions in a citizen science project involving schools across the whole of Sweden.

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Swedish pupils to develop source criticism tool in unique research project

Press Release 18 May 2017

Fake news is a topic that is currently generating much debate. But what kind of news is streaming through young people’s digital news feeds? And how trustworthy do young people think this news is? For the first time, researchers and pupils from across Sweden will together be investigating these questions in a mass experiment being run as part of the 2017 Researchers’ Night in Sweden.

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Europe’s largest science festival celebrated in 250 cities

As European Researchers’ Night kicks off today (Friday 30 September) in 250 cities around Europe, we take a look at some of the activities that will be sparking the interest of members of the public in other countries and showing what researchers really do for society in a fun and engaging way.

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Wanted: Swedish pupils to participate in pioneering research

Press release 29 May 2015

They can be found outside the supermarket, at the bus stop, at the swimming pool: public notice boards, covered in handwritten notes, messages and posters. But what is the function of the physical notice board in the digital age? Who is saying what? And why? Scientists are now seeking the help of school pupils to map the contents of public notice boards around Sweden.

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European science festival celebrates 10th anniversary in 27 towns across Sweden

Press release 31 August 2015

On 25 September it’s time for the European science festival Researchers’ Night that is taking place in 300 cities throughout Europe. In Sweden 27 towns are inviting schoolchildren and the general public to meet scientists in a range of activities, including workshops, science shows, science cafés and behind-the-scenes tours of research labs. The aim of Researchers’ Night is to show that scientists are ordinary people with extraordinary jobs.

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CARROTS AND APPLES ON TOP AS SWEDISH PUPILS HELP SCIENTISTS MAP THEIR EATING HABITS

Press release 29 May 2015.

Swedish children and teenagers are pretty diligent at eating fruit and vegetables, according to the results of a mass experiment organised as part of Researchers’ Night. In the Vegetable Experiment, scientists at the Swedish National Food Agency enlisted the help of over 5500 pupils, who acted as research assistants for a day. Carrots and apples top the list of most eaten vegetables and fruit.

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Swedish children to help climate scientists by burying tea bags

Press release 9 February 2015.

Is it possible to read the future in tea leaves? This is what scientists at Umeå University are hoping to find out and they are now looking for school classes across Sweden to participate in a mass experiment that will help to inform climate change research. The so-called ‘Tea Bag Experiment’ is part of the European science festival, Researchers’ Night.

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10,000 pupils assist Swedish scientists with climate research

Press release 11 April 2014.

Spring is now here and it arrives earlier each year.  A warmer climate means an earlier spring and a later autumn. But how is the delayed onset of autumn affecting the Swedish ecosystem? A mass experiment involving over 10,000 pupils across Sweden is helping scientists to study the effect of climate change on deciduous trees in autumn. Läs mer


Children to help researchers map climate change

Press release 20 May 2013

Is climate change leading to a delay in when leaves turn colour in the autumn? Pupils from across Sweden will be helping researchers determine how the climate is affecting the growing season of plants and the onset of autumn. This mass experiment is part of the science festival Researchers’ Night.

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Research by young people reveals that we refrigerate our food at too high a temperature

Press Release 16th Jan 2012

In three out of four cases, meat is being stored at a higher temperature than the recommended maximum of 4 ° C.  This is the finding of new research carried out by over 1,800 Swedish pupils. The pupils were examining their refrigerators as part of the Swedish Researchers’ Night science festival.

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